Teach like a chimp! The validity-transportability paradox in teaching

validity-transportability-paradoxA paradox of attempting to apply ideas from research into the real world is that the simplified environments of scientific experiments allow for the formation of extremely complex explanations, whilst the application of those ideas into the more complicated real world often require that they are somewhat simplified. The ideal conditions required for creating validity, and those required for creating transportability (the easy transmission of an idea into the real world, to borrow a phrase from Jack Schneider’s 2014 book ‘From the ivory tower to the school house’), are almost completely opposing. This clearly creates a dilemma: how much erosion of validity do we accept in order to allow a theory to become transportable?

‘The Chimp Paradox’… Paradox

Until recently I was something of a validity purist on this matter. I remember a seminar I attended last year with Vincent Walsh, a neuroscientist at UCL who studies sporting performance and decision-making under pressure and works with various GB sports teams. At one point, mention was made of Steve Peters, the psychiatrist who has also made a name working with some of the biggest names in UK sport such as Chris Hoy, Victoria Pendleton, Steven Gerrard and Ronnie O’Sullivan, as well as a lucrative consultancy side-arm with hundreds of companies. Peters’ work, detailed in his book ‘The Chimp Paradox’ involves dividing the mind into two competing parts; a primitive “Chimp” brain (the limbic area), which deals with emotions, and a more rational “Human” brain (the frontal cortex). In Peters’ formulation the chimp brain works 5 times faster than the human brain. In some of his work with sportspeople a third region is introduced: the “Computer” brain, which is even faster (20 times as fast as the human and 4 times faster than the chimp!)

Peters’ clients are taught to recognise their mental states and to govern nerves, pressures and insecurities according to these three brain labels. Now, from a purely neuroscientific perspective, Peters’ ideas are at best a severe oversimplification, and at worst outright inaccurate. I won’t spend time here covering the reasons for this (though this page is a decent introduction to the difficulties of dividing the brain into regions according to their ‘development’). However (and this was the point made to me when I voiced these concerns), when you have Chris Hoy crediting Peters with his gold medals, you can’t really argue with his results. Sometimes an idea can be a ‘useful simplification’ (or even a ‘useful fiction’, depending on how stringent your criteria are), containing enough accurate information to help people whilst remaining widely transportable. The success of ‘The Chimp Paradox’, then, is precisely because the complicated science behind Peters’ claims have been simplified enough to have broad accessibility and appeal to people’s everyday lives – ‘The Chimp Paradox’ Paradox, if you will.

Validity vs transportability in teaching

Whilst I’m sure this observation is far from new, it has struck an interesting chord with me recently in thinking about applications of research to teaching. I was reminded of it last week when I inevitably stumbled across yet another ‘Edu-Twitter’ debate about the chosen methods of a particular North-West London school. I know I shouldn’t, but, like a fire in a carpet warehouse, it’s hard not to slow down and watch the carnage unfold. This particular debate centred on the school’s use of certain principles of cognitive psychology (notably interleaving and spacing) as a justification for some of their methods. Some comments on the thread accused the school of oversimplifying complex theories (and implied that this therefore made them worthless). I might previously have agreed with this position, but as we have seen it is clear that some simplified scientific ideas, properly packaged, can be enormously useful to some people. If we are to embed evidence-based practice in school, then the first step is surely to embrace it in any form initially, and work out the finer details from there.

The difficulty is that there are no clear indicators as to where to draw the line between validity and transportability. Indeed, the ‘Goldilocks zone’ may be different for each idea anyway, depending, for example, on the transportability of the original idea and the extent to which it can be simplified whilst still retaining a coherent message. The downside of this process is that more complex theories (which may well resist simplification for very good reasons) will lack transportability, limiting the extent to which they are able to be widely adopted. As an example from another Twitter feed last week:
screen-shot-2017-01-30-at-16-11-17

Whilst the post was widely appreciated in certain circles, I was struck by how Cognitive Load Theory, an idea that is so central to much educational scholarship (and which is potentially an extremely helpful concept for educators) has, in my experience at least, never really caught on in classrooms. I would argue that this might be because its rather nuanced division of cognitive load into three different types is not the sort of thing that is easily transported in 140 characters or casual break-time conversation. The validity/transportability balance for CLT is an interesting story in itself; this essay from Michael Pershan charts Sweller’s attempts to balance the complexity and validity of his theory with its transportability. It is hard to see how CLT could be further simplified without losing its essential essence, but equally in its current form I’m not convinced it’s that transportable.

Teach Like a Chimp

teach-like-a-champion
With apologies to Doug Lemov…

So what are the ‘useful simplifications’ in teaching? Which academic ideas can be easily simplified into transportable forms without losing their validity? I might suggest the following:

– Applied memory strategies (e.g. spacing, interleaving, testing etc)
– Elaboration (linking to previous knowledge)
– Encouraging metacognition
I would previously have suggested feedback, but following the EEF review into marking it’s clear that this issue is rather more complicated (or less well researched) than we might imagine.

What other ideas would people suggest?

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Teach like a chimp! The validity-transportability paradox in teaching

2 thoughts on “Teach like a chimp! The validity-transportability paradox in teaching

  1. “Now, from a purely neuroscientific perspective, Peters’ ideas are at best a severe oversimplification, and at worst outright inaccurate.”

    I think the difference between a severe oversimplification and an inaccuracy is the key point here. I have no problem at all with simplifying things in order to apply them in the classroom. In fact it seems sensible. But I do have a problem with getting teachers to believe things that are simply wrong, even if it is a “noble lie” that supposedly will improve their practice.

    With regard to the fashion for cognitive psychology among teachers in social media in the last few years, I think that “over simplified” has become an easy way to attack it, yet it is used indiscriminately and often as an ad hominem. Very often the ideas that we are told have been left out of the “simplified” model of learning are either irrelevant, or in some cases, crankery. Very often teachers are condemned for their ignorance of some aspect of psychology, where the only evidence that they don’t know about it is that they failed to mention it in a situation where it is of no clear relevance. I have developed a standard test for claims of of “over-simplification”, I ask “but what did they get wrong as a result of simplifying?”. If nobody can answer this, then one can dismiss the claim as irrelevant to teachers.

    Liked by 1 person

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